Book Seven


Book Seven covers a range of topics in a journey from wickedness to tranquility. Marcus explores what wickedness truly means, and scoffs at the idea of eliminating it, concluding instead that the best we can do is restrain it, with anger and passion being the enemy of reason and therefore against nature. He states that no-one is bereft of the truth (“straight of itself, not made straight”) and compels us to pity (rather than despise) the fool. Marcus says that immortality is mans greatest desire (however unattainable) and advises therefore that we live every day as if it were our last, not worrying about the future (as it will all be ok in the end, and although the body and mind may suffer, the soul does not). He encourages us to keep our essence (“I must still be as an emerald”), and appears to be greatly moved by the plight of Socrates who was of course forced to drink poison:

https://goo.gl/SvsJUe

Socrates is forced to drink the poison hemlock, depiction by Jacques-Louis David, on display at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Socrates is forced to drink the poison hemlock, depiction by Jacques-Louis David, on display at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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